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Q: Infectious Synovitis Overview

A:

Infectious Synovitis Also called
Mycoplasmosis (one form), MS, big hock disease, enlarged hocks,

Prevalence-
Once common in commercial flocks of "broilers" (chickens raised for meat), now quite rare due to NPIP monitoring. Low mortality, however it often occurs as a concurrent infection, so the other infection may cause death. because survivors can become carriers, culling is usually recommended

Signs
General signs -
Lack of appetite, lethargy, fluffed up feathers. Slow growth, pale or blue comb, green droppings with lots of white urates. Emaciation.
Cardinal or diagnostic signs -
Lameness, swollen legs and/or feet that are hot to the touch.

Cause/s -
Mycoplasma synoviae bacteria, which often appears as a secondary infection. Occasionally caused by E. coli bacteria.

Communicability -
Yes. Airborne, or can be passed from hen to chick in ovo.

Communicability to humans -
No

Incubation period -
10 - 20 days

Latent
Yes. Chickens who survive and recover may be carriers.

Endemic


Home treatment and/or prevention -
Prevention: Practice good biosecurity. Acquire good stock from trusted sources. Practice quarantine with new birds. There is a vaccine.

Treatment: Antibiotics may be used, but which and how effective they are will depend on the bacteria causing the infection.

Veterinary care -Consult a vet to get a firm diagnosis and appropriate antibiotics

Recovery - Survivors can become carriers and spread the disease to other flocks. Culling is recommended.

Other conditions, illnesses and/or diseases with similar signs:
Leg injury, Marek's Disease



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